george monbiot

george monbiot.png

intro’d to George july 2013 – ted global – rewilding the world

In his book “Feral,” George Monbiot advocates the large-scale restoration of complex natural ecosystems.

now thinking.. holmgren indigenous law

need-to-become-indigenous-holmgren

found myself scratching at the walls of life..

thinking hari present in society law:

created a society johann

in comfortable safe crowded lands.. few opps to exercise them (our wild nature) harming other people..

this was a constraining i found….. to conquer uncertainty.. to know what comes next.. has almost been the industrial aim..

beyond lifespan of h & g’s.. nor was it authenticity i was looking for.. i don’t find that a useful/intelligible concept.. i just wanted a richer/rawer life than i’ve been able to lead in britian..

only when i stumbled upon an unfamiliar word.. that i began to understand what i was looking for.. and as soon as i found it.. i realized i wanted to devote much of rest of my life to..

r e w i l d i n g

even though a young word.. several defns.. but 2 that fascinate me:

1\ mass restoration of ecosystems..

discovery of widespread trophic cascades.. ie: yellowstone park when wolves re intro’d in 1995.. kill animals.. but give life to many others.. ie: deer changed behavior.. to hide from wolves.. and those areas repopulated ecologically.. ie: height of trees 5x in just 6 yrs.. birds/beavers come..  creating nisches for other species..

really interesting.. wolves changed behavior of rivers.. regenerating forest stabilized the banks..  soil erosion stabilize..  physical geography changed

another ie: whales crucial to ecosystem…  pooping and kicking water… sequestering carbon.. changing atmosphere composition

trophic cascades.. tell us ecosystem is even more amazing that we thought.. huge case for bringing back indangered species..

rewilding to me.. bringing back missing plants/animals.. taking down fences.. blocking the drainage ditches.. preventing commercial fishing.. but otherwise… stepping back..

we all need to become indigenous

it has no view as to what a right ecosystem or assemblage of species looks like..  it doesn’t try to produce…. it lets nature decide.. nature is pretty good at deciding

no agenda.. ness.. no strings .. ness

listen to all the voices

2\ rewilding of human life

because there would be wonderful re wilded habitats

return of mega fawna… it’s not climate that’s gotten rid.. it’s pressure from humans..

talking antifragile.. via being elephant adaptive..

antifragile

walking down ave…. seeing shadows of these great beasts.. paleoecology.. study of past ecosystems.. feels like a portal thru which you can pass into an enchanged kingdom…

why shouldn’t all of us have a serengeti (ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa) on our doorsteps..

most interesting thing.. that rewilding offers us.. the most important thing that’s missing from our lives… h o p e… in motivating people to love/defend the natural world.. an ounce of hope is worth a ton of despair..

the story rewilding tells us .. is that ecological change need not always proceed in one direction.. it offers us a hope that our silent spring could be replaced by a raucous summer…

*raucous: making or constituting a disturbingly harsh and loud noise. “raucous youths”
indeed..hosting-life-bits via self-talk as data.. helping us listen.. giving us hope.. of a nother way..
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black wild ness law

wilde not us law

science of people in schools

wildness

control.. perpetuate\ing not us ness… feedback loop is broken..let go.

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re intro’d and adding page while reading this 2012 article.. – gift of death

http://www.monbiot.com/2012/12/10/the-gift-of-death/

Researching her film The Story of Stuff, Annie Leonard discovered that of the materials flowing through the consumer economy, only 1% remain in use six months after sale

[..]

People in eastern Congo are massacred to facilitate smart phone upgrades of ever diminishing marginal utility. Forests are felled to make “personalised heart-shaped wooden cheese board sets”. Rivers are poisoned to manufacture talking fish. This is pathological consumption: a world-consuming epidemic of collective madness, rendered so normal by advertising and the media that we scarcely notice what has happened to us.

In 2007, the journalist Adam Welz records, 13 rhinos were killed by poachers in South Africa. This year, so far, 585 have been shot. No one is entirely sure why. But one answer is that very rich people in Vietnam are now sprinkling ground rhino horn on their food or snorting it like cocaine to display their wealth. It’s grotesque, but it scarcely differs from what almost everyone in industrialised nations is doing: trashing the living world through pointless consumption.

[..]

The growth of inequality that has accompanied the consumer boom ensures that the rising economic tide no longer lifts all boats. In the US in 2010 a remarkable 93% of the growth in incomes accrued to the top 1% of the population. The old excuse, that we must trash the planet to help the poor, simply does not wash.

[..]

Bake them a cake, write them a poem, give them a kiss, tell them a joke, but for god’s sake stop trashing the planet to tell someone you care. All it shows is that you don’t.

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after cap panel – oxfard farming conf 2017

https://www.ofc.org.uk/video/after-cap-what-0

3 min – all the features.. which harbor wildlife.. which prevent floods downstream.. which keep the soil on the land.. you have to remove those.. if you are to claim for the land.. so it’s a 50 mill euro perverse incentive for max environmental destruction

4 min – if subsidy system.. has to be a fair one: 1\ rural hardship fund.. but i don’t see why farmers would be main recipient of that.. should be allocated on basis of need not occupation  2\ provision of public goods.. protection/prevention  3\ transitional fund to counter perverse effects been suffering.. ie: payment to help new entrants..

imagine if we tried no money

6 min – if we are to move toward a more market based system.. it has to be a fair market

is there one..? who decides.. ? seems like wasted energy.. seems like what you said in 2012.. choosing market is showing  you don’t care..

7 min – the best way to deal with an unfair market is to make it fair

is it..? even if that were possible..  it would market (day-care/dehuman) us..

we can do better.. go deeper..

29 min – we need to negotiate tariff quotas with every single commodity with every single exporter/inporter nation on earth.. if to employ entire civil service.. couldn’t do it.. and result w/a lot of non negotiated.. and will just have to wing it

indeed…. what a waste of energy

33 min – rep ing 50 000 farmers – lady to his right

oy.. a rep speaking for people.. ie: public consensus always oppresses someone

george – not true.. farming id’d as primary cause of destruction of wild life and habitats.. embracing the environment is not the picture you get from currrent farming practices…

38 min – ? education.. cultural reform – lady to his right

44 min –

skimmed this.. as it kept reminding me how much time/money we spend listening to a few talk about the problems/solutions.. sitting in our suits and ties and dresses and hose.. on the panel or in the audience.. ugh.. spending most of time talking about balancing moneys

there’s a nother way.. hosting-life-bits via self-talk as data

1:02 – final question to panel.. what would you farm, where, and how would you make a profit..

yes.. because we can’t imagine life without profit ness… and they all just laugh..

george.. i would farm water

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find/follow George:

link twitter

www.monbiot.com

wikipedia small

George Joshua Richard Monbiot (/ˈmɒnbi/ mon-bee-oh; born 27 January 1963) is a British writer, known for his environmental and political activism. He writes a weekly column for The Guardian, and is the author of a number of books, including Captive State: The Corporate Takeover of Britain (2000) and Feral: Searching for Enchantment on the Frontiers of Rewilding (2013). He is the founder of The Land is Ours, a peaceful campaign for the right of access to the countryside and its resources in the United Kingdom.

In January 2010, Monbiot founded the ArrestBlair.org website which offers a reward to people attempting a peaceful citizen’s arrest of former British prime minister Tony Blair for alleged crimes against peace.

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Working as an investigative journalist, he travelled in Indonesia, Brazil, and East Africa. His activities led to his being made persona non grata in seven countries and being sentenced to life imprisonment in absentia in Indonesia. In these places, he was also shot at, beaten up by military police, shipwrecked and stung into a poisoned coma by hornets. He came back to work in Britain after being pronounced clinically dead in Lodwar General Hospital in north-western Kenya, having contracted cerebral malaria.

In Britain, he joined the roads protest movement and was often called to give press interviews; as a result he was denounced as a “media tart” by groups such as Green Anarchist and Class War. He was attacked by security guards, who allegedly drove a metal spike through his foot, smashing the middle metatarsal bone. His injuries left him in hospital. Sir Crispin Tickell, a former British diplomat at the United Nations, who was then Warden at Green College, Oxford, made the young protester a Visiting Fellow.

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Among his best-known articles are his critique of David Bellamy’s climate science, his description of an encounter with a police torturer in Brazil, his attack on libertarian interpretations of genetics, his discussion of the ethics of outsourcing, and his attack on the politics of Bob Geldof and Bono.

In January 2011, Monbiot took the unusual step of publishing an account of his assets. In the interests of transparency, Monbiot explained that he earned £77,400 a year, gross, from publishing contracts and rents, and urged other journalists to follow suit. He continues to publish his financial accounts on his website.

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He is the patron of the UK student campaign network People & Planet and appears in the film The Age of Stupid in animated form, in which he says “The very fact that the crisis is taking place within our generation, it’s happening right now, means that we are tremendously powerful people. So this position of despair and ‘I can’t do anything’ and ‘there’s no point’ is completely illogical, it’s exactly the opposite

[..]

Monbiot has been associated with the cause of indigenous rights, and has sought to denounce threats to tribal people, at the face of corporate interests. He contributed to the 2009 book We Are One: A Celebration of Tribal Peoples, which explores the culture of peoples around the world, portraying both its diversity and the threats it faces.

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Monbiot’s first book was Poisoned Arrows (1989), a work of investigative travel journalism exposing what he called the “devastating effects” of the partially World Bank-funded transmigration program on the peoples and tribes of Papua and West Papua in Indonesia. It was followed by Amazon Watershed (1991) which documented expulsions of Brazilian peasant farmers from their land and followed them thousands of miles across the forest to the territory of the Yanomami Indians, and showed how timber sold in Britain was being stolen from indigenous and biological reserves in Brazil. His third book, No Man’s Land: An Investigative Journey Through Kenya and Tanzania (1994), documented the seizure of land and cattle from nomadic people in Kenya and the Tanzania, by—among other forces—game parks and safari tourism.

[..]

His fifth book, The Age of Consent: A Manifesto for a New World Order, was published in 2003. The book is an attempt to set out a positive manifesto for change for the global justice movement. Monbiot criticises anarchism and Marxism, arguing that any possible solution to the world’s inequalities must be rooted in a democratic parliamentary system.

?

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The book also discusses ways in which these ideas may be put into practice. He posits that the United States and Western European states are heavily dependent on the existence of this debt, and that when faced with a choice between releasing the developing world from debt and the collapse of the global economy, their internal economic interests will dictate that they opt for the “soft landing” option. …..He argues that ultimately the global justice movement “must seek…to provide a coherent programme of alternatives to the concentrated power of the dictatorship of vested interests.”

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Feral: Searching for Enchantment on the Frontiers of Rewilding was published in 2013, and focuses on the concept of rewilding the planet. Monbiot states “rewilding offers a positive environmentalism. Environmentalists have long known what they are against; now we can explain what we are for.”

In the book, Monbiot attacks sheep farming as “a slow-burning ecological disaster, which has done more damage to the living systems of this country than either climate change or industrial pollution. Yet scarcely anyone seems to have noticed.” He particularly looks at sheep farming in Wales.

The book received favourable reviews, including in publications normally hostile to his work, such as The Spectator and The Daily Telegraph. It won the Society of Biology Book Award for general biology in 2014.

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@GeorgeMonbiot

The age of intensifies. The emotional pain can be overwhelming: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jan/06/half-a-million-older-people-spend-every-day-alone-poll-shows

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@jseelybrown

In the age of robots, our schools are teaching children to be redundant | George Monbiot theguardian.com/commentisfree/…

Let’s engineer our children out of the factory and into the real world.

revolution of everyday life. a nother way

facil curiosity  ie: hosting-life-bits via self-talk as data..as the day [aka: not part\ial.. for (blank)’s sake…]

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Céline (@krustelkram) tweeted at 7:55 AM – 14 Apr 2017 :

Thanks so much for writing about @KateRaworth ‘s doughnut economics
@GeorgeMonbiot & also this: https://t.co/iha927Ng43 and many others. <3 https://t.co/kFQlwbmZX9 (http://twitter.com/krustelkram/status/852883037427818496?s=17)

we respond to these crises as if they emerge in isolation, apparently unaware that they have all been either catalysed or exacerbated by the same coherent philosophy; a philosophy that has – or had – a name.

What greater power can there be than to operate namelessly?

neoliberalism

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Neoliberalism sees competition as the defining characteristic of human relations. It redefines citizens as consumers, whose democratic choices are best exercised by buying and selling, a process that rewards merit and punishes inefficiency. It maintains that “the market” delivers benefits that could never be achieved by planning.

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Attempts to limit competition are treated as inimical to liberty

competition

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Inequality is recast as virtuous: a reward for utility and a generator of wealth, which trickles down to enrich everyone. Efforts to create a more equal society are both counterproductive and morally corrosive. The market ensures that everyone gets what they deserve.

equity – everyone getting a go everyday..

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In The Road to Serfdom, published in 1944, Hayek argued that government planning, by crushing individualism, would lead inexorably to totalitarian control. Like Mises’s book Bureaucracy, The Road to Serfdom was widely read. It came to the attention of some very wealthy people, who saw in the philosophy an opportunity to free themselves from regulation and tax. When, in 1947, Hayek founded the first organisation that would spread the doctrine of neoliberalism – the Mont Pelerin Society – it was supported financially by millionaires and their foundations.

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among American apostles such as Milton Friedman – to the belief that monopoly power could be seen as a reward for efficiency.

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Something else happened during this transition: the movement lost its name. In 1951, Friedman was happy to describe himself as a neoliberal. But soon after that, the term began to disappear. Stranger still, even as the ideology became crisper and the movement more coherent, the lost name was not replaced by any common alternative

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It may seem strange that a doctrine promising choice and freedom should have been promoted with the slogan “there is no alternative”

free dom.. gray play law

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The freedom that neoliberalism offers, which sounds so beguiling when expressed in general terms, turns out to mean freedom for the pike, not for the minnows.

Freedom from trade unions and collective bargaining means the freedom to suppress wages. Freedom from regulation means the freedom to poison rivers, endanger workers, charge iniquitous rates of interest and design exotic financial instruments. Freedom from tax means freedom from the distribution of wealth that lifts people out of poverty.

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As Naomi Klein documents in The Shock Doctrine, neoliberal theorists advocated the use of crises to impose unpopular policies while people were distracted

Naomi

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Another paradox of neoliberalism is that universal competition relies upon universal quantification and comparison. ..The doctrine that Von Mises proposed would free us from the bureaucratic nightmare of central planning has instead created one.

measuring ness.. compare ness

Neoliberalism was not conceived as a self-serving racket, but it rapidly became one.

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Rent is another term for unearned income

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As property prices and the withdrawal of state funding load people with debt (think of the switch from student grants to student loans), the banks and their executives clean up.

debt as violence

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neoliberal theory asserts, people can exercise choice through spending. But some have more to spend than others: in the great consumer or shareholder democracy, votes are not equally distributed. The result is a disempowerment of the poor and middle.

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Like communism, neoliberalism is the God that failed. But the zombie doctrine staggers on, and one of the reasons is its anonymity. Or rather, a cluster of anonymities.

The invisible doctrine of the invisible hand is promoted by invisible backers.

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Neoliberalism’s triumph also reflects the failure of the left. When laissez-faire economics led to catastrophe in 1929, Keynes devised a comprehensive economic theory to replace it. When Keynesian demand management hit the buffers in the 70s, there was an alternative ready. But when neoliberalism fell apart in 2008 there was … nothing.

This is why the zombie walks.

campos walk up law

The left and centre have produced no new general framework of economic thought for 80 years.

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What the history of both Keynesianism and neoliberalism show is that

it’s not enough to oppose a broken system.

A coherent alternative has to be proposed.

a nother way

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marina gorbis (@mgorbis) tweeted at 7:25 AM – 17 Apr 2017 :

Finally, a breakthrough alternative to growth economics – the doughnut | George Monbiot | Opinion | The Guardian https://t.co/OPcYYcwCrq (http://twitter.com/mgorbis/status/853962561884114944?s=17)

We cannot hope to address our predicament without a new worldview. We cannot use the models that caused our crises to solve them. We need to reframe the problem.

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 The area between the two rings – the doughnut itself – is the “ecologically safe and socially just space” in which humanity should strive to live. The purpose of economics should be to help us enter that space and stay there.

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New metrics would measure genuine prosperity, rather than the speed with which we degrade our long-term prospects….By rethinking economics from first principles, Raworth allows us to integrate our specific propositions into a coherent programme, and then to measure the extent to which it is realised.

great.. but how to get there.. i don’t think incrementally measuring.. via donut or whatever.. is going to get us to equity (everyone getting a go everyday)

we have to just set people free.. w/mech to facil that chaos (not to measure or validate it).. ie: a nother way