katie salen – dm&l – play

katie salen 6 bw

Her essence of connected learning film by Nic Askew.
https://vimeo.com/47111398

PLAY from Nic Askew on Vimeo.

Her amazing work with the Institute of Play:

institute of play site

Her work with New School & Quest to Learn:

quest to learn site

Charles Raben, 9th Grade Student at Quest to Learn from Institute of Play on Vimeo.

via.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/whitney-burke/connected-learning-a-approach-for-our-time_b_3269437.html

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Katie’s wikipedia page.

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Her CLRN interview:

young people are fascinating..

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play matters. let’s create more spaces – of permission – to just play. no?

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connected learning

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http://digital.hechingerreport.org/content/quest-to-learn-tests-students-through-play_1123/

by Anya Kamenetz..

The school’s ethos reaches its strongest expression for two weeks at the end of each trimester, when the students drop everything for an exercise known as Boss Level. During this two-week intensive, the students work in teams with their “home base
 
During this two-week intensive, the students work in teams with their “home bases” (similar to homerooms) to incorporate what they have learned over the previous trimester and apply it to solve a new, complex problem.
You probably have a warm memory of immersing in some sort of project or competition like this during your school years, whether during a sport, an extracurricular or even a class. What makes Boss Level different is the time and respect accorded to the experience, and the way students are guided to connect it with the rest of their education. As a MacArthur Foundation case study puts it, “Boss Levels confer academic legitimacy on creative activities that are typically absent or marginalized at conventional schools.”
[free flowing my thinking in love/respect for all they are doing at quest 2 learn]
no doubt… waaaay cool.
but imagine.. this happening 24/7 in the city. as the day.
with no pre set agenda of learned content…
 Boss Levels confer academic legitimacy on creative activities that are typically absent or marginalized at conventional school
yeah.
oh my.
 academic legitimacy on creative activities….?
 If physics doesn’t grab you, you can take charge of the costumes, or stand outside the classroom and play a Christmas carol on the trumpet to usher in the judges. 
physics can’t not grab you.
perhaps what is meant…
if physics doesn’t grab you for said content….no…?
But it’s not all just fun and games. There’s a real rigor to the competition. 
dang..
no…. ?
In part, the novelty of being judged by outside observers helps motivate the students to bring their A-game, and in the judges’ room we took our deliberations very seriously
or that’s our authenticity a- game’s biggest … most unquestioned… invisible… elephant.. in the air…  no…?
There’s a real rigor to the competition
perhaps.. I might add… in ignorant boldness…
there is no true grit (if that is what is meant by real rigor here)…..
there can be no real/true/ongoing/sustainable-when no ones looking.. applauding .. awarding…
if there is the scarcity element… of competition..
in the judges’ room we took our deliberations very seriously. We found ourselves arguing about the essence of creativity and commitment: should we reward the ambitious teams for trying harder or the “perfect” kids who played it safe.
oof..

 

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