joshua wong

joshua wong.png

[hong kong]

intro’d to Joshua via the umbrella protest..

adding page this day:

@TIME

Watch the trailer for award-winning documentary about Joshua Wong, Hong Kong’s teenage activist ti.me/2p3mstl

demand freedom of mind and freedom of speech

clay shirky: it’s the joan of arc story.. the youngster who can see the world clearly comes into a complicated adult conflict.. the sense of scale could not be larger..

clay

wasn’t a political campaign.. was a sense of innocence that make people identify with it

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find/follow Joshua:

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Secretary-general of political party , founder of former student activist group . Email: joshua@demosisto.hk

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wikipedia small

Joshua Wong Chi-fung (Chinese: 黃之鋒, born 13 October 1996) is a Hong Kong student activist who serves as secretary general of Demosistō. He is also the convenor and founder of the Hong Kong student activist group Scholarism (now disbanded). Internationally known for his prominent role during the 2014 Umbrella Revolution, his major influence in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement has resulted in his inclusion in TIME’s Most Influential Teens of 2014, nomination for TIME’s Person of the Year 2014 and recognition by Fortune as one of the world’s greatest leaders in 2015.

Joshua Wong was born in Hong Kong in 1996, and was diagnosed with dyslexia soon thereafter. The son of middle-class couple Grace and Roger Wong, Joshua was raised as a Protestant Christian. His social awareness stems from his father, who often took him, as a child, to visit the underprivileged.

Wong studied at the United Christian College (Kowloon East), and developed organisational and speaking skills through involvement in church groups. The 2010 anti-high speed rail protests were the first political protests in which he took part.

On 29 May 2011, Wong and schoolmate Ivan Lam established Scholarism, a student activist group. The group began with simple means of protest, such as the distribution of leaflets against the newly-announced moral and national education (MNE). In time, however, Wong’s group grew in both size and influence, and in 2012 managed to organise a political rally attended by over 100,000 people. Wong received widespread attention as the group’s convenor. On 27 September 2014, Wong was one of the 78 people arrested by the police during a massive pro-democracy protest, after hundreds of students stormed Civic Square in front of the Central Government Complex as a sign of protest against Beijing’s decision on the 2014 Hong Kong electoral reform. However, unlike most of those arrested who were freed soon afterwards, Wong remained in custody for 46 hours, until his lawyers moved a writ of habeas corpus.