chernobyl

from Danny Cook

Earlier this year I had the opportunity to visit Chernobyl whilst working for CBS News on a ’60 Minutes’ episode which aired on Nov. 23, 2014. Bob Simon is the correspondent. Michael Gavshon and David Levine, producers.

For the full story cbsnews.com/news/chernobyl-the-catastrophe-that-never-ended/

via http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2851668/A-drone-s-eye-view-CHERNOBYL-Eerie-footage-reveals-city-left-decay-devastating-nuclear-disaster.html

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The Chernobyl disaster (Ukrainian: Чорнобильська катастрофа, Chornobylska Katastrofa – Chornobyl Catastrophe; also referred as Chernobyl or the Chornobyl accident) was a catastrophic nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine (then officially the Ukrainian SSR), which was under the direct jurisdiction of the central authorities of the Soviet Union. An explosion and fire released large quantities of radioactive particles into the atmosphere, which spread over much of the western USSR and Europe.

The Chernobyl disaster was the worst nuclear power plant accident in history in terms of cost and casualties, and is one of only two classified as a level 7 event (the maximum classification) on theInternational Nuclear Event Scale (the other being the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011). The battle to contain the contamination and avert a greater catastrophe ultimately involved over 500,000 workers and cost an estimated 18 billion rubles (18 billion $USD) . During the accident itself, 31 people died, and long-term effects such as cancers and deformities are still being accounted for.

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Your roots are in the infinite (@thejaymo) tweeted at 8:40 AM – 26 Apr 2019 :
Permanently Moved – 1907 – Chernobyl
Reflecting on the 33rd anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, and bullet pointing the things I remember from the visit I made to the site in 2011
https://t.co/Mv6g2XIPAo (http://twitter.com/thejaymo/status/1121786195690819584?s=17)

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Slava Malamud (@SlavaMalamud) tweeted at 4:18 PM – 24 May 2019 :
Also, my 17 year old son watched with me, and his first reaction was to immediately dive into the Google rabbit holes trying to research as much as possible about Chernobyl. I don’t know about you, but to me this is as good a testimony of the shows greatness as anything (http://twitter.com/SlavaMalamud/status/1132048262154850304?s=17)

from earlier tweet in thread.. referring to a series on hbo

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on plant life better than before chernobyl

Clive Thompson (@pomeranian99) tweeted at 10:28 PM – 30 Jun 2019 :
“Why plants don’t die from cancer”: https://t.co/nIe4Z9r4Ww I’d never thought about this before, but it’s fascinating (http://twitter.com/pomeranian99/status/1145549724851822597?s=17)

In animals this is often fatal, because their cells and systems are highly specialised and inflexible. Think of animal biology as an intricate machine in which each cell and organ has a place and purpose, and all parts must work and cooperate for the individual to survive. A human cannot manage without a brain, heart or lungs.

Plants, however, develop in a much more flexible and organic way. Because they can’t move, they have no choice but to adapt to the circumstances in which they find themselves. Rather than having a defined structure as an animal does, plants make it up as they go along. Whether they grow deeper roots or a taller stem depends on the balance of chemical signals from other parts of the plant and the “wood wide web”, as well as light, temperature, water and nutrient conditions.

In a way, the Chernobyl disaster reveals the true extent of our environmental impact on the planet. Harmful as it was, the nuclear accident was far less destructive to the local ecosystem than we were. In driving ourselves away from the area, we have created space for nature to return.

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